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Disease knowledge, perceived risk, and health behavior engagement among adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

  • Jamie L. Jackson
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Center for Biobehavioral Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, J West 4th Floor, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. Tel.: +1 614 722 3585; fax: +1 614 722 3544.
    Affiliations
    Center for Biobehavioral Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA

    Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Kelly Tierney
    Affiliations
    Center for Biobehavioral Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Curt J. Daniels
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

    Columbus Ohio Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program, The Heart Center, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA

    Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Kathryn Vannatta
    Affiliations
    Center for Biobehavioral Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA

    Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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Published:September 29, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2014.08.009

      Abstract

      Objective

      Survivors of congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk for life-threatening complications as they age. This study aimed to examine the association of knowledge of future health risks, perceived risk, and health behaviors among adolescents and adults with CHD.

      Methods

      CHD survivors (N = 200, ages 15–39; 23% simple, 44% moderate, 33% complex lesions) completed measures of risk knowledge accuracy and perceived risk for developing complications, and reported physical activity and saturated fat intake.

      Results

      CHD survivors reported poor risk knowledge and consuming high-fat diets. Adolescents reported more physical activity than young adults. Greater risk knowledge was associated with lower fat intake, and participants who exercised more expected fewer future complications, and this difference remained statistically significant when accounting for education and age.

      Conclusions

      CHD survivors, regardless of age, have poor risk knowledge and diets. Survivors may benefit from emphasis on future health risks and health behaviors from both pediatric and adult providers.

      Keywords

      Abbreviations:

      CHD (congenital heart disease), CHD-AIM (Congenital Heart Disease Assessment of Information Measure), FIS (Northwest Lipid Fat Intake Scale), GLT (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire)
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